The Ins and Odds of St. Patrick’s Day

Originally St. Patrick’s Day was a religious feast held in honor of the Irish patron saint, on March 17, the day of his death. In his teens, he was kidnapped near his home, and worked as a slave in Ireland for almost two decades before managing to escape back to England.

After joining the Catholic church, he returned to Ireland to share the gospel. Many legends surround the time St. Patrick spent sharing his faith with the Irish. They are the basis of how St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated today.

Celebrations began in Boston in 1737 as a way to honor Irish and Irish-American culture by the colonists. The first time a military unit joined a St. Patrick’s Day parade was in 1762. Since that day in New York, military units have made it a  tradition to march each year.

Did The Irish Really Eat Corned Beef and Cabbage?

The short answer is yes. The long answer is only the Irish-American’s because brisket, cabbage, and root vegetables were cheap in the colonies. In Ireland, beef was expensive, so the Irish ate mostly ham and bacon which were prevalent and affordable. Today’s St. Patrick’s Day menus pay homage to both the Irish and the Irish-American’s. Check out these modern recipes. Continue reading “The Ins and Odds of St. Patrick’s Day”