Somewhere Safe

I locked the deadbolt and flicked the regular lock into place, dropped my bag on the chair and sagged against the door. Safe from the insanity outside. For now. How much longer could I cope? There were still six months left on my lease. With a sigh, I pushed off the door and crossed the large single room of my studio apartment to the walk-in closet in the back corner.

“Hello Eric, how was your day?” I shrugged out of my dress clothes and slipped into shorts and a t-shirt. “Are you awake?” I knelt on the closet floor and peered past a crumpled hoodie on the bottom shelf. Continue reading “Somewhere Safe”

My Fear of Journaling

Growing up I never bought a diary or journal for myself, but I did receive a few as gifts. Flowers and butterflies in a variety of colors decorated the hardback cover and the inside pages. The paper was soft and inviting. When I ran my hand over it I felt the urge to write.

It was ready to hold all my stories, fears, worries, crushes, pet peeves, joys, discoveries, hopes, and dreams. With my favorite well-chewed pen, I was ready to document my life!

But I could never make myself write in it. Continue reading “My Fear of Journaling”

The Ins and Odds of St. Patrick’s Day

Originally St. Patrick’s Day was a religious feast held in honor of the Irish patron saint, on March 17, the day of his death. In his teens, he was kidnapped near his home, and worked as a slave in Ireland for almost two decades before managing to escape back to England.

After joining the Catholic church, he returned to Ireland to share the gospel. Many legends surround the time St. Patrick spent sharing his faith with the Irish. They are the basis of how St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated today.

Celebrations began in Boston in 1737 as a way to honor Irish and Irish-American culture by the colonists. The first time a military unit joined a St. Patrick’s Day parade was in 1762. Since that day in New York, military units have made it a  tradition to march each year.

Did The Irish Really Eat Corned Beef and Cabbage?

The short answer is yes. The long answer is only the Irish-American’s because brisket, cabbage, and root vegetables were cheap in the colonies. In Ireland, beef was expensive, so the Irish ate mostly ham and bacon which were prevalent and affordable. Today’s St. Patrick’s Day menus pay homage to both the Irish and the Irish-American’s. Check out these modern recipes. Continue reading “The Ins and Odds of St. Patrick’s Day”

The Flu from Hell and Finding Happiness Again

December is a crazy month for most people. The myriads of parties, school functions, travel hassles, and shopping trips collide with; visiting relatives, birthdays, and anniversaries which compete with; bored kids, menu planning, holiday fun, preparing at least one elaborate meal, and if you’re a football fanatic, cheering on your favorite football team as they fight for a playoff spot. There’s so much to do most of this paragraph is one long sentence.

And the whirlwind of activity isn’t over.

New Year’s celebrations demand your attention. The kids beg to stay up until midnight. You pray you can stay awake that late. Once the clock strikes midnight you toast the new year, followed by comforting your fur babies when the inevitable fireworks (giant bangs and thundering booms) begin. Before you can take a breath everyone wants to know what your resolutions are, which means you have to frantically come up with a few or explain why you don’t make them anymore.

Then January flies in with bad weather, football playoff parties, Christmas gift returns, and the hope that things will calm down soon.

Black Ice

photo credit: Albany crash via photopin (license)
photo credit: Albany crash via photopin (license)

A couple of days before Thanksgiving it was as if I’d run over a patch of black ice and lost control. Continue reading “The Flu from Hell and Finding Happiness Again”