Racked With Doubt

A few months ago, I met Nadia L. King (nadialking) on Instagram. She and I became friends. I love the creative things she posts and how encouraging and funny she is.

I visited Nadia’s blog back in January. Her most recent post (at that time) What Now? resonated with things I’ve caught myself worrying about. I asked her if I could reblog her post and she said yes. Thank you, Nadia.

Way To Go!

Congratulations, friend, on publishing your first short story in the U.S. That’s an awesome accomplishment. I’m proud of you.

Worry

In typical writer-fashion, after Nadia shared her good news with her readers she worried about what was next and if she would successfully publish anything else.

. . . I can’t help asking myself, what next? . . .

I’ve entered a few Australian short story competitions and cross everything, with beginners luck, maybe I’ll be shortlisted for one, or dare I hope for more? My stories have been submitted to literary magazines and I try to sit tight and not chew on my nails too often.

But the most overwhelming question in my mind – what if Disappointment was the only thing I’ve written or will ever write, that will make it? This is the thought that disturbs my nightly sleep.

I believe such worries plague all creatives. Are we good enough? Is what we do of any worth? Will this next piece be bought and sold? What if, (and I say this with all of my heart in my mouth) what if none of this is any good?

Continue reading “Racked With Doubt”

Behind the Scenes of ‘The Fire-Pit’

Until I began writing The Fire-Pit I never thought about what went into writing a novel. At the library or bookstore, if an authors’ name or a cover caught my eye, I read the blurb on the back. If it sounded interesting I took the book home. It was fairly easy to find an entertaining story.

The last eighteen months have been an adventure. Grab a camp chair and join me by the fire.

Research

A great story idea came to me in the shower. Guess I ought to write a book.

Yep, that’s how it started. With an idea. Part of my idea involved a food truck. I spent many hours learning everything I could about food trucks.

I spent days creating my characters. I found images on google. I interviewed each character, asking 40 in-depth and probing questions. I learned a lot about them.

Despite being scared I was ready to write. So I did the research all over again. I repeated this process for six months.

Camp NaNoWriMo

There was a blog, written by indie author Donna B. McNicol, that I regularly read. She announced in July that she was super busy writing all of August’s blog posts ahead of time because of Camp NaNoWriMo. I remember eagerly following the link to discover what this camp was all about. Camp NaNoWriMo is where writers come together and for a month write like crazy. You can do anything, a novel, a screenplay, blog posts, non-fiction, newsletters, or research for an upcoming project. I decided it might just be the kick in the pants I needed to escape this research quagmire I’d fallen into.

I wrote every day for two and a half weeks. On day 17 my characters went on strike citing unsafe working conditions. They claimed boredom had almost resulted in several of them dying. They refused to come back to work until I’d watched a few action adventure movies. I argued with them. They won. Continue reading “Behind the Scenes of ‘The Fire-Pit’”